TROOPS TO TEACHERS "Proud to Serve Again"



Troops to Teachers is a U.S. Department of Defense program
that helps eligible military personnel begin a new career
as teachers in public schools where their skills,
knowledge and experience are most needed.

Friday, July 25, 2014  
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Reservation Information

Teaching Information

       Teaching on a Reservation can be rewarding  but also there are issues that the prospective teacher    must be ready to deal with. Many of these are cultural issues and a lack of support from parents. Similar to what teachers face in inner city schools. Poverty on a Reservation for the non native visiting the Reservation for the first time can be a cultural shock. Distances are vast. As an example, it is a six hour drive from Phoenix to Window Rock on the Navajo Reservation.  Also on many reservations there is a lack of housing. Many returning veterans who entered service from
the Reservation and desire to return have less of a problem because they either already have housing on the Reservation or can stay with family until housing becomes available. Also keep in mind for non-native troops to teacher candidates desiring to teach  in Native Schools  their is an Indian Preference clause.Having said all of this, many non Indians teach on the Reservation and many have made a career of teaching Indian children for twenty years are more.I have met teachers on the Navajo Reservation who would not think of teaching anywhere else. For the returning veteran who desires to teach on the Reservation it is an opportunity to give back to the Tribe, to share the wealth of knowledge he/she has gained in military service .
   
       There are different types of schools on reservations: Public, Tribal, BIA and Mission. Depending on the type of
school you're interested in, the steps will be different. If you're interested in a public school then you'd go through the school district that oversees the school. For example, here in Nevada, the school on the Duck Valley Indian Reservation
is part of the Elko County School District. The school on the Walker River Paiute Reservation is part of the Mineral County School District. There is no Indian preference in public schools. If you're interested in a tribal school, you'd
apply through the tribe. I believe that the Navajo Nation has its own schools and you'd apply for those through the Navajo Nation. In these schools Indian preference probably does apply. If you're interested in a BIA school, you'd apply through the BIA. Pyramid Lake High School is a BIA school where you can apply for positions through the BIA or the Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe. Indian preference applies to BIA schools If you're interested in a mission school, you'd contact the school directly to find out what their hiring procedures are. I'm aware of several mission schools located on reservations in South Dakota.

     In regards to certification, if the school receives federal funding, teachers must be "highly qualified" per NCLB. Emergency certification procedures will vary depending on the type of school (public, tribal, BIA, mission, etc.), the state where the school is located and the school itself.

Native American Affairs

Troops to Teachers Associate Regional Director of Native American Affairs, Colonel (Ret.) Joey Strickland, has been named to recruit, counsel and assist with job placement on as many as three hundred reservations across the United States. Strickland, who is American Indian of Choctaw-Hispanic descent, also served as Louisiana Director of Indian Affairs from 1996 to 2004. In May 1995, and was selected from 80 candidates to serve as Louisiana State Director of Troops to Teachers as a member of the Louisiana Governor’s personal staff.  Col. Strickland served as Director of the Louisiana State office of Troops to Teachers, from 1995 until 1998 where he was able to establish an alternative certification program. Col. Strickland became Director of the Louisiana Department of Veterans Affairs. Strickland most recently retired after five years as the head the Arizona Department of Veterans’ Services after serving more than 10 years as the Deputy Secretary and Executive Director of the Louisiana Department of Veterans.

“I am very excited and happy to be back with Troops to Teachers. I have kept up with former Troops to Teachers Chief, Dr. John Gantz and Regional Director Colonel Joe Morgan, as well as the current TTT Chief, Mr. Bill McAleer,” says Strickland. “Joey Strickland will bring great leadership ability to an area that has been greatly underserved by our organization. His efforts will no doubt bring military veterans into the classrooms in ever increasing numbers,” says Colonel Morgan.

“Being of Native American heritage, it was always a goal of mine to help bring Troops to Teachers to Native American veterans and provide them the same opportunity in reservation schools. It is a known fact that after completion of their military service many Indian veterans return to their reservations. There is usually a shortage of non-Indian teachers on the reservations because of housing shortages and isolation. I see my role as the POC for Indian veterans desiring to be teachers through the Troops to Teachers Program. Presenting weekly on Reservations will give me the opportunity to educate potential candidates, principals, superintendents and Indian leadership about the benefits of hiring military veterans who will be wonderful role models within the Troops to Teachers program. My duties will also include educating national Indian organizations (NCAI, USET) on Troops to Teachers, as well as speaking to and about native colleges and universities who may desire to create alternative certification programs for those who wish to “proudly serve again.” My initial duties will focus primarily in the four corners of New Mexico, Utah, Arizona and Colorado, but will outreach to other states with any needed support, eventually branching north, west, and then to the east.”  

 ~Strickland
For information on get licensure requirements or information on teaching on one of our nations reservations, please contact
Mr. Strickland,  email jstrickland@troopstoteachers.net

          

News from Indian Country

01

From a distance, Navajo Mountain looks like a smooth bubble in the earth. It's easy to see why local tradition describes it as the War God's pillow. The closer you get, however, the more rugged the landscape becomes. From high points on U.S. 98, the true nature of the country stretching out from the sacred peak becomes apparent: a hellish labyrinth of gorges and rock formations. It's easy to see how the Navajos here escaped the Long Walk by hiding from the cavalry in this maze. Even today, you have to know your way around if you want to hike here without getting lost or falling off a cliff. Over the years, the area has hidden more than the Diné who fled from Kit Carson's roundup. Read more from Cindy Yurth at http://www.navajotimes.com/news/chapters/101713navmtn.php#at_pco=smlre-1.0

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Comments

David Madison
# David Madison
Tuesday, November 05, 2013 12:26 PM
Great article Kim. Thanks

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